My heart is not proud, O LORD,
my eyes are not haughty.
I do not concern myself with great matters or things too wonderful for me.
But I have stilled and quieted my soul; like a weaned child with its mother,
like a weaned child is my soul within me.
Psalm 131:1–2

David describes a spiritual change that has taken place within him: He has become like a child weaned from its mother. What does he mean by that?

I have ministered in countries where women habitually nursed their babies in my meetings. Each time an infant would begin to cry and disturb the service, the mother would immediately pacify it by giving it the breast. Thus I came to appreciate in a practical way the difference between a weaned and an unweaned child. An unweaned child cries and expects something immediately from its mother. A weaned child leaves the initiative to its mother; it trusts her to serve food at the right time.

As a result of being “weaned,” David no longer concerned himself with great matters or things too wonderful for him. We, too, must allow God to wean us from our natural, undisciplined arrogance that cries for answers to problems that are not our concern. Instead, we must learn to accept the spiritual food that God prepares for us at the time He sees fit to serve it.

Being weaned is a necessary stage in a child’s progress to maturity. In my own life, since I have learned to leave the initiative with God, I find that I receive much more from Him. The diet of a weaned child is much more varied than that of an unweaned one.

Faith’s Response

I renounce arrogance, Lord, and I trust You to give me my daily bread—both natural and spiritual.

This devotional is taken from

Through the Psalms
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